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Date

Nov 2

Location

USU Ballroom

Time

8:00AM - 4:00PM

Description

With the goal of fostering an understanding of historical context, solidarity, and community building, the LBSU Students of Color Conference will equip students with a better understanding of social justice issues and the means to become influential change agents in society.

Time: 9:00 - 9:40AM

Zahra Billoo

Keynote title: Finding Love and Facing Trump
Keynote description: Growing up as the daughter of immigrants and a Muslim fighting back

Zahra Billoo serves as the Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, San Francisco Bay Area (CAIR-SFBA) office, the oldest and one of the largest CAIR chapter offices. Since joining in 2009, Zahra has led the organization through a period of six-fold growth. Today, she manages one of the largest CAIR offices in the country with a team of civil rights and social justice advocates dedicated to the empowerment of American Muslims through legal services, legislative advocacy, and community organizing. Read More

Under Zahra’s leadership, CAIR-SFBA has filed lawsuits against the United States Department of Justice,Abercrombie and Fitch, and Southwest Airlines, representing American Muslims facing discriminatory treatment.CAIR-SFBA has also significantly expanded its capabilities to provide know-your-rights sessions on a nearly weekly basis to mosques and community members in the San Francisco Bay Area, while also providing direct legal representation to Bay Area residents facing numerous civil rights violations, including FBI interviews, employment discrimination, airport harassment, school bullying, and hate crimes.

Zahra’s advocacy has included media appearances in local and national media, including MSNBC, NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, and even FOX News. Notably, Zahra was a speaker at the historic Women’s March in Washington D.C. in January 2017. Among her awards, she received the 2017 Human Rights Award from the Society of American Law Teachers and the 2014 Unsung Hero Award from the National Lawyers Guild, San Francisco Bay Area Chapter. She was also listed by the San Jose Mercury News as a “Woman to Watch” in March 2017 for Women’s History Month, as well as by the Chronicle of Philanthropy in their January 2018 cover story on millennials who lead.

She is currently a fellow with the American Leadership Forum’s Silicon Valley Chapter and an alumna of Rockwood’s Fellowship for a New California, LeaderSpring’s Executive Directors Fellowship, and USC’s American Muslim Civil Leadership Institute. Zahra earned her undergraduate degrees from the California State University, Long Beach, and her Juris Doctorate from the University of California, Hastings. She is licensed to practice law in California.

Outside of her work with CAIR, Zahra bakes birthday cakes for foster children through Cake4Kids and is a coordinator for Project Feed, a monthly homeless feeding effort in downtown San Francisco.

Time: 9:45 - 10:45AM

Workshop Description: This Know Your Rights workshop will advance the capacity of immigrants, particularly undocumented immigrants, to avoid the unjust detentions and/or deportations that can cause dire hardship for families through geographic separation and the loss of an essential wage-earner. It also teachers participants how to exercise their rights and make preparations for the well-being of children and other family members in cases of deportation. This presentation will also cover the importance of community organizing and community building.
Presenter: Gaby Hernandez, Maribel Cruz, Jamilet Ochoa
Location: Room No: 303 (cap: 36)

Gaby Hernandez

Gaby Hernandez is an undocumented scholar and community organizer. She is currently the Associate Director for the Long Beach Immigrant Rights Coalition. As LBIRC’s Associate Director, she is responsible for developing and overseeing all of LBIRC’s campaigns and programs. Her experiences as an undocumented migrant have fueled her passion for social justice and immigrant rights. She believes in the importance of people power and grassroots organizing. Gaby is currently working on her Master thesis in Applied Anthropology at CSULB and received her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology with a minor in International Studies from CSULB. Gaby’s graduate research focuses on depicting the experiences of undocumented students.

 
Maribel Cruz

Maribel is LBIRC’s Operations manager. Born in Mexico City, Maribel has lived in Long Beach, CA since she was a child. Growing up as an undocumented youth, she has lived through many of the experiences of those in the immigrant community with whom she now works with on a daily basis. Maribel leads the legal clinics, DACA workshops, and the administration of the organization. In college, Maribel was part of Future Under Representative Educated Leaders (F.U.E.L) at California State University, where she graduated with bachelor’s degree in Political Science.

Zahra Billoo

Workshop description: How to safely intervene, protecting each other from hate crimes and harassment
Presenter: Zahra Billoo
Location: Room No: 304 (cap: 42)

Zahra Billoo serves as the Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, San Francisco Bay Area (CAIR-SFBA) office, the oldest and one of the largest CAIR chapter offices. Since joining in 2009, Zahra has led the organization through a period of six-fold growth. Today, she manages one of the largest CAIR offices in the country with a team of civil rights and social justice advocates dedicated to the empowerment of American Muslims through legal services, legislative advocacy, and community organizing. Read More

Under Zahra’s leadership, CAIR-SFBA has filed lawsuits against the United States Department of Justice,Abercrombie and Fitch, and Southwest Airlines, representing American Muslims facing discriminatory treatment.CAIR-SFBA has also significantly expanded its capabilities to provide know-your-rights sessions on a nearly weekly basis to mosques and community members in the San Francisco Bay Area, while also providing direct legal representation to Bay Area residents facing numerous civil rights violations, including FBI interviews, employment discrimination, airport harassment, school bullying, and hate crimes.

Zahra’s advocacy has included media appearances in local and national media, including MSNBC, NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, and even FOX News. Notably, Zahra was a speaker at the historic Women’s March in Washington D.C. in January 2017. Among her awards, she received the 2017 Human Rights Award from the Society of American Law Teachers and the 2014 Unsung Hero Award from the National Lawyers Guild, San Francisco Bay Area Chapter. She was also listed by the San Jose Mercury News as a “Woman to Watch” in March 2017 for Women’s History Month, as well as by the Chronicle of Philanthropy in their January 2018 cover story on millennials who lead.

She is currently a fellow with the American Leadership Forum’s Silicon Valley Chapter and an alumna of Rockwood’s Fellowship for a New California, LeaderSpring’s Executive Directors Fellowship, and USC’s American Muslim Civil Leadership Institute. Zahra earned her undergraduate degrees from the California State University, Long Beach, and her Juris Doctorate from the University of California, Hastings. She is licensed to practice law in California.

Outside of her work with CAIR, Zahra bakes birthday cakes for foster children through Cake4Kids and is a coordinator for Project Feed, a monthly homeless feeding effort in downtown San Francisco.

Workshop Description: The workshop focuses on understanding racism as a way in which the modern world was constructed. It seeks to challenge student conceptions of the idea that race is merely about identities, discrimination, stereotypes, or about the US. We interrogate the role that capitalism has used racism to construct relations of power to make a world in its image and interests. In doing so we also highlight struggles that have pushed for alternative world making projects.
Presenter: Dr. Alfredo Carlos, Dr. Nina Flores, Dr. Yousef Baker
Location: Room No: 305 (cap: 40)

Alfredo Carlos

Alfredo Carlos (he/him/his) is a Faculty of Political Science and Chicano and Latino Studies. he has a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Irvine where he specialized in the fields of Political Economy. He earned his M.A. in Political Science from California State University, Long Beach with a focus in Comparative Politics and International Relations and his B.A. is in History and Chicano Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He Studies Political Economy; Mexican, Chicano and Latino Politics; Labor and Inequality; Economic Democracy; Urban Racial and Ethnic Politics; Immigration and Imperialism. He was born in Jerez, Zacatecas, Mexico and grew up in the Harbor Area of Los Angeles in a working class immigrant community. As immigrants he and his family, like many other immigrants and working people lived in a barrio experiencing life as people who were working poor. This experience of living in poverty has come to influence and to a large extent define his work as a scholar, an activist, a mentor and a father.

 
Yousef-Baker

Yousef Baker (Ph.D. UCSB, Sociology, 2014). Iraq/Iran. His dissertation, Global Capitalism and Political Control: Investigating the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq focuses on theories of globalization and development, social movements, nationalism, and questions of race and migration, with a specialization in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Specifically, Baker looks at the political and economic development models deployed in Iraq during the U.S. occupation, and the effort to gain consent for these models from Iraqi civil society. Much of the current research on Iraq draws from either geo-political or conjunctural analyses of the war, while this study utilizes a systematic structural analysis. He traces the intent and strategies of the U.S. administration in Iraq by examining laws implemented, agreements signed with and on behalf of the Iraqi government, contracts awarded, and policies that were favored and lobbied for in Iraq. His work offers a vital contribution to the field of globalization studies through a meticulous case study, based on research conducted in Baghdad, on the changing nature of the nation-state. Through this research he demonstrates how processes of globalization have given rise to a structural tension wherein economic circuits of accumulation are transnational, whilst political legitimacy is still confined within the nation-state.

 
Nina Flores

Nina M. Flores, PhD (she/her/hers) is an Assistant Professor with the Social & Cultural Analysis of Education graduate program at CSULB. Her courses are based in critical pedagogies and use education as a vehicle for analyzing systems of oppression, social injustices, and strategies for resistance. Most recently her research has focused on experiences with public harassment, and the post-graduation trajectories of students involved in campus activism. Reach out on twitter: @bellhookedme.

Christian Lozano-Cuellar

Workshop Description: The Community Cultural Wealth presents a strength-based framework when looking at the experiences and knowledge students of color bring to the classroom setting. Coined by Dr. Yosso, she focuses on the experiences and knowledge students of color bring to the classroom setting. Additionally, participants discuss intersectionality, privilege, and how they can use their wealth to succeed in academia without sacrificing who they are.
Presenter: Christian Lozano-Cuellar
Location: Room No: 306 (cap: 30)

Lozano is a proud immigrant and DACA beneficiary that has worked very hard to accomplish some of his goals, such like becoming the Assistant Director for the Office of Multicultural Affairs at California State University. He with his family immigrated to Indiana where he got his undergraduate degree in Business and he then attended graduate school in Ohio where he earned his degree in Higher Education Administration. Lozano keeps the needs of students at the core of the work that he does and supports their efforts to organize and in educating others on social justice movements.

Time: 10:50 - 11:50AM

Workshop Description: The white fathers told us, I think therefore I am; and the black mothers in each of us-the poetwhispers in our dreams, I feel therefore I can be free. Sometimes we drug ourselves with dreams of new ideas. The head will save us. The brain alone will set us free. But there are no new ideas still waiting in the wings to save us as women, as human... There are only new ways of making them felt. Audre Lorde, Poetry is not a Luxury The presentation will situate storytelling as a powerful tool in the pursuit of social justice. Storytelling is a craft that helps to develop emotional connections to our struggles. Public narrative is both an art and a science, and has long been utilized as an organizing tactic to galvanize people into taking action. Black Lives Matter, DREAMers, and various other activists have utilized storytelling to convey the complexity of their lived experiences. In research settings, counternarratives, stories, and testimonios present alternative forms of data that subvert supposedly empirical studies that otherwise marginalize communities of color further. Finally, storytelling is also an important form of reflection that allows for social justice leaders to take stock of their own lived experiences and what drives them to take action. In addition to providing some background on the power of storytelling for social change within activist and academic contexts, students will be led through an activity to craft narratives of change for their communities and/or causes. Presenters will also share photo projects to demonstrate different mediums for storytelling.
Presenter: Dr. Esa Syeed, Dr. Claudia Maria Lopez, Jazzmin Lisett Mercado, Lucy Ngo
Location: Room No: 303 (cap: 36)
Esa Syeed

Esa Syeed is an assistant professor of sociology at CSULB whose research and teaching is focused at the intersection of education and social change. As a Kashmiri and Muslim American, he engaged with social justice issues from an early age. He is especially excited to present at this conference with former students!

 
Claudia Lopez

Claudia Maria Lopez is an assistant professor in the Sociology department at CSU Long Beach. Her research interests focus on global migration and displacement, citizenship, memory, and political resistance. Her background as a Colombiana-Mexicana growing up in the Bay Area, has shaped her approaches to social justice which highlights the communities, not academics, as the experts.

 
Jazzmin Mercado

Jazzmin Lisett Mercado graduated Cum Laude from the University of California, Long Beach with a BA in Sociology. She currently works as a Youth Organizer at the Korean Resource Center. Her passion for social justice stems from her experiences of being raised by her low-income immigrant mother. It also stems from her hardships as a young Latinx womxn. Through these difficulties, she experienced firsthand marginalization that her identities came with. Then, motherhood made Jazzmin dream of a fair society in which her children could thrive and have opportunities. She hopes to cultivate her dream through the power of storytelling.

 
Lucy Ngo

Lucy Ngo is a CSULB student for the graduate social work program. Born in Westminster, her community nurtured and raised her to advocate for a more equitable, kinder society.

Workshop Description: The panel will be moderated by me while interviewing successful people of color 3 being csulb alumni and 1 alumni from CSDH. talking about the stereotypes having to overcome in our perceptive fields while servicing underrepresented communities. Natalie and Edgar speaking on the business owner perspective and Jen and Ebony on the social work and community engagement field. A difference panel consisting of Salvadorian, Mexican, Hawaiian, American and African American college graduates. All having a masters degrees from Cal state systems.
Presenter: Natalie Torres-Haddad, Dania Rivas, Ebony Jones & Jennifer Miyamoto Echeverria
Location: Room No: 304 (cap: 42)

Natalie Torres Haddad

A two time TEDx Speaker known for her talk "The Foreign Language of Financial Literacy" and "The Confidence Gap". An international Award Winning Author, a bilingual podcast host of Financially Savvy in 20 minutes, international keynote speaker and educator. Her activities have been featured in the Huffington Post, LA Times, 60 second docs and a Honda commercial as herself a financial literacy advocate, with both features receiving over 2 Million views since published this year. A first generation College Graduate from CSULB in Finance and International Business with a Masters in public Administration from CSUN. She focuses helping those in debt to keep working towards their financial independence. Born in El Salvador and raised in Inglewood during the LA riots she quickly understood that the lack of higher education and financial illiteracy limits her community of basic human rights and equality in resources. She started investing in real estate at 24 and began her career advocating for financial and women empowerment for equal pay. Her challenges dealing with student debt which led her to dealing with depression have influenced her to advocate for mental and financial health to be taught in all schools and work environments.

 
Dania Rivas

Dania Rivas, M.Ed., is a Life, Leadership & Organizational Coach and owner of WilderCoach—a professional coaching service that specializes in working with environmental and outdoor industry leaders that want to cultivate a diverse, equitable, and inclusive (DEI) workplace culture. Dania coach’s organizational teams and works one-on-one with professionals of color and other historically marginalized voices in the conservation field. Dania is passionate about the environment and values community, culture, and connection around nature, and firmly believes that diverse representation in the outdoors is vital to the health of our environment and communities.

Dania is a first-generation college graduate (making her part of the 4% of Latinas with a Master’s degree in the US) and chose to follow her heart and pursue a life and career in the outdoors as an Outdoor Leadership Instructor, hiker, backpacker, and Naturalist. Dania was born and raised in Hawthorne, CA, and currently resides in Portland, OR.

 
Ebony Jones

Ebony Jones is the CEO of Cultivate the Movement Consulting. A two time graduate of CSU Dominguez Hills, Ebony started her career in the government and non profit sectors providing youth advocacy, education, and coordination of housing services for homeless and transitional age youth. She fell in love with non profit work and community engagement while growing up in Compton, CA where her passion flourished for the expansion of resources for underprivileged communities and social change.

 
Jennifer Miyamoto Echeverria

A graduate of Cal State University, Long Beach with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and a Master of Social Work degree has spent much of her career working in mental health and the juvenile justice system. She has experience in all levels of social work from direct practice providing therapy to individuals and families; to building out and managing a children's trauma program; to overseeing social workers in an acute psychiatric inpatient setting. After over a decade and a half of working in mental health, Jennifer made the decision to venture off and bring her community-based organization experience to the managed care world. Now working with Blue Shield of California Promise Health plan, Jennifer hopes to be able to bring her experience to address social determinants of health, and work to make realistic, thoughtful, innovative changes in healthcare for patients in the Medi-Cal/Medicare system.

Workshop Description: The workshop focuses on understanding racism as a way in which the modern world was constructed. It seeks to challenge student conceptions of the idea that race is merely about identities, discrimination, stereotypes, or about the US. We interrogate the role that capitalism has used racism to construct relations of power to make a world in its image and interests. In doing so we also highlight struggles that have pushed for alternative world making projects.
Presenter: Dr. Alfredo Carlos, Dr. Nina Flores, Dr. Yousef Baker
Location: Room No: 305 (cap: 40)

Alfredo Carlos

Alfredo Carlos (he/him/his) is a Faculty of Political Science and Chicano and Latino Studies. he has a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Irvine where he specialized in the fields of Political Economy. He earned his M.A. in Political Science from California State University, Long Beach with a focus in Comparative Politics and International Relations and his B.A. is in History and Chicano Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He Studies Political Economy; Mexican, Chicano and Latino Politics; Labor and Inequality; Economic Democracy; Urban Racial and Ethnic Politics; Immigration and Imperialism. He was born in Jerez, Zacatecas, Mexico and grew up in the Harbor Area of Los Angeles in a working class immigrant community. As immigrants he and his family, like many other immigrants and working people lived in a barrio experiencing life as people who were working poor. This experience of living in poverty has come to influence and to a large extent define his work as a scholar, an activist, a mentor and a father.

 
Yousef-Baker

Yousef Baker (Ph.D. UCSB, Sociology, 2014). Iraq/Iran. His dissertation, Global Capitalism and Political Control: Investigating the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq focuses on theories of globalization and development, social movements, nationalism, and questions of race and migration, with a specialization in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Specifically, Baker looks at the political and economic development models deployed in Iraq during the U.S. occupation, and the effort to gain consent for these models from Iraqi civil society. Much of the current research on Iraq draws from either geo-political or conjunctural analyses of the war, while this study utilizes a systematic structural analysis. He traces the intent and strategies of the U.S. administration in Iraq by examining laws implemented, agreements signed with and on behalf of the Iraqi government, contracts awarded, and policies that were favored and lobbied for in Iraq. His work offers a vital contribution to the field of globalization studies through a meticulous case study, based on research conducted in Baghdad, on the changing nature of the nation-state. Through this research he demonstrates how processes of globalization have given rise to a structural tension wherein economic circuits of accumulation are transnational, whilst political legitimacy is still confined within the nation-state.

 
Nina Flores

Nina M. Flores, PhD (she/her/hers) is an Assistant Professor with the Social & Cultural Analysis of Education graduate program at CSULB. Her courses are based in critical pedagogies and use education as a vehicle for analyzing systems of oppression, social injustices, and strategies for resistance. Most recently her research has focused on experiences with public harassment, and the post-graduation trajectories of students involved in campus activism. Reach out on twitter: @bellhookedme.

Time: 12:35 - 1:35PM

Melina Abdullah

Panelist/Keynote: Dr. Melina Abdullah
Dr. Melina Abdullah is a recognized expert on race, gender, class, and social movements. She was among the original group of organizers that convened to form Black Lives Matter and continues to serve as a Los Angeles chapter leader.

She is also Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Abdullah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in Political Science and her B.A. from Howard University in African American Studies. Read More

Professor Abdullah is a womanist scholar-activist, understanding the role that she plays in the academy as intrinsically linked to broader struggles for the liberation of oppressed people. Professor Abdullah is a leader in the fight for Ethnic Studies in the K-12 and university systems and was a part of the historic victory that made Ethnic Studies a requirement in the Los Angeles Unified School District, also serving on the Taskforce for the Advancement of Ethnic Studies for the California State University system.

Abdullah is the author of numerous articles and book chapters, with subjects ranging from coalition-building to womanist mothering. She has contributed to popular media outlets, including The Root, Los Angeles Times, Truthdig, Los Angeles Sentinel, Los Angeles Progressive, and BK Nation.

She is also co-host and co-producer of the weekly radio program Beautiful Struggle which airs on KPFK, part of the Pacifica radio network, and hosts and produces the weekly internet radio show “Move the Crowd,” which airs on Radio Justice (radiojustice.org).

From 2014-2018, Dr. Abdullah served on the Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission, where she initiated and chaired the county-wide hearings on community experiences with policing and was instrumental in replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous People’s Day. Dr. Abdullah also serves on a number of boards for, among others, the Black Community, Clergy and Labor Alliance (BCCLA), California Faculty Association-Los Angeles, Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA-CAN), and the National Association for Ethnic Studies.

Melina is the recipient of many awards, most recently the 2018 Community Service Award from National Council for Black Studies, 2017 Unsung Heroes Award from the Oscar Grant Foundation, 2017 Extraordinary Service Award from the African Heritage Studies Association, 2017 Justice Work Award from Beyond the Bars, 2017 Freedom Fighter Award from the NAACP, 2017 Activist Award presented by the National Association for Ethnic Studies, among numerous others.

She has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, TV One, ABC, PBS, Revolt TV, KTLA, KCET, BET, Free Speech TV, and Al-Jazeera, and is featured in the films "Waking the Sleeping Giant," "13th," "When Justice Isn’t Just," and "Justice or Else" and in the television series "Two Sides."

Melina is originally from Oakland, California. She is a single “soccer mama” of three children and resides in Mid-City Los Angeles.

 
Place Holder

Panelist: Thulani Ngazimbi
Thulani Ngazimbi is the Founder of The Rad Black Kids. A native of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Thulani began snowboarding 6 months after the moved to the USA at age 17. Living in Pocatello Idaho, the only way to stave from a winter bout of Seasonal Affective Disorder was snow sports. Outdoors became an addiction, and summers became occupied with long boarding the hills of Southeast Idaho! Thulani then moved to New York to finish his undergrad degree in marketing. His affinity for the environment, endowed to him through his grandmother through ideals of respecting the earth, inspired him to pursue a Masters in Energy Management, and an Advanced Certificate in Environmental Management! Even though he developed micro-energy generation devices and water issues, his dream since age 14 had been clothing design. He decided to start a company that not only would hold sustainability as its core principles, but would also bring marginalized voices to the forefront in an area were we stereotypically not known to ‘exist,’ which was action sports. This is what led to The Rad Black Kids. The Rad Black Kids engages sustainable measures from “uplifting garments” out of landfills; sourcing product within a 50 mile radius of LA; engaging in multi-stage sustainable initiatives that not only lead the company to be carbon neutral, but “carbon negative.” The Rad Black Kids also plant a tree for every product sold through an NGO that trains families to plant, grow and manage forest farms in various, targeted African countries. The Rad Black Kids began in 2014 and since inception is approaching 2000 trees planted.

 
Christanne Myers

Panelist: Christanne Myers
My name is Christanne Myers and I am a Los Angeles Native. I received my Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Humboldt State University. Humboldt State University is a predominantly white university (PWI) located in a rural town where I was constantly reminded that there were no academic and culturally relative support systems that actively acknowledged my intersectional identities. It was clear that the existing staff and faculty lacked the knowledge of how to efficiently support me as a low-income, first-generation, Black and Native American woman in higher education. My experiences navigating the school environment and recognizing the lack of support systems for students of color, allowed me to consider aiding other students of color in excelling. This realization revealed my purpose in higher education and resulted in me collaborating to establish HSU’s African-American Community Building Coordinating position at the Multicultural center. I undertook the responsibility of building an inclusive environment for students of color on campus. My feelings of exclusion were not a limiting factor throughout my undergraduate career, but rather a point of propulsion that has lead me to earning my Masters of Science in Counseling with an option in Student Development in Higher Education at California State University, Long Beach.

 
Sabrina Ware

Panel Moderator: Sabrina Ware
Sabrina Ware started with ASI Beach Pride Events as a student in fall 2012, when she became heavily involved in event programming and student government. For her, Beach Pride Events was a space to develop professionally and in her leadership. After graduating with her Bachelors in Communication Studies from Long Beach State in 2016, she decided to pursue full-time employment with ASI. Sabrina began her full time career with the USU Conference and Events Center on campus as an event coordinator and in July of 2018 transitioned to her current position of Beach Pride Events Coordinators for ASI Beach Pride Events.

Time: 1:40 - 2:40PM

Joselle de los Reyes

Workshop Description: Learn how to build people power from the ground up through community organizing. We will share our methods and experiences of how to build a youth led grassroots movement and go over the National Democratic Movement in the Philippines as an example for how youth are fighting in the struggle against US imperialism today.
Presenter: Joselle de los Reyes, Terrilyn Vergara Williams, Owen Albers
Location: Room No: 303 (cap: 36)

Joselle de los Reyes is a 2nd generation Filipino American that grew up in an immigrant household in Oxnard, California. The arduous struggles that her parents faced due to immigration sparked the interest of studying Sociology in community college to understand the systematic reasonings that cause people to leave their homeland. In 2017 she transferred to CSULB and in the 2018 she joined Anakbayan Long Beach to help arouse, organize, and mobilize the masses. As a Spring 2019 graduate, prioritizing community organizing has set a fire in her that will forever pursue the fight for liberation of our people.

Hatefas Yop

Workshop Description: Imagine writing your history and your community into existence and coming across the numerous attempts ensure this legacy is erased. From the annexation of Kingdom of Champa, current day Vietnam in 1471, to the mass genocide of Chams under the Khmer Rouge regime and Vietnam War in the 1970s-- these historic tragedies has caused the Cham to be further removed from their indigenous Cham history, leaving the following generations of Cham left only with language. Today, the Cham people are still not recognized as an ethnic group, often many linking their identity to Vietnam or Cambodia. Islam has also played a crucial role to the Chams since the 11th century, many Chams today identify with the Islamic faith. However, many American born Chams are dealt with multifaceted identities being not Asian enough to be considered Cambodian or Vietnamese, and not being Muslim enough to fall within the Muslim Arab speaking hierarchy. As Cham people transitioned to new homes, their identities were transformed not only by their past but also their future. They came to ask themselves crucial questions about what it means to be Cham. Over half a million Cham people today face pressures to interpret and define themselves not only for outsiders who often have a limited perspective on the Cham, but also for themselves.
Presenter: Hatefas Yop
Location: Room No: 304 (cap: 42)

Hatefas Yop, was raised by parents who escaped Cambodia’s killing fields and arrived in the United States in September of 1979. Before coming to CSU Long Beach, Hatefas has attended several community colleges and UC Riverside. Hatefas Yop holds an Associates of Arts Degree in Ethnic Studies from Santa Ana College and is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in Asian American Studies. Hatefas is a former community organizer at The Cambodian Family Community Center, where she organized survivors of Cambodia's Killing Fields to advocate for equitable county mental health services. Hatefas is also a poet, whose writing expresses her experiences growing up first generation Cham American, while still learning to embrace her Cham identity. The Cham ethnic group are from Southeast Asia that have been displaced from their homeland of Champa, modern day Vietnam and parts of Cambodia. She is a strong believer in the importance of diversifying oral histories. Everyone has a story to share and there are many lessons to be learned from it.

Dr. Keith Claybrook

Workshop Description: Participants will construct a society by placing a particular group of people in the position of power and privilege. This will allow for a visual contextualization of the broader issues to be discussed in the history of the so-called oppressed peoples. Dr. Claybrook will place emphasis in the talk and discussion on resistance to the exploitation and oppression they experienced.
Presenter: Dr. M. Keith Claybrook
Location: Room No: 305 (cap: 40)

Dr. M. Keith Claybrook, Jr. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Africana Studies. He earned his doctorate from Claremont Graduate University in 2016. He is currently working on his first book entitled Beyond the Spectacle: The Black Freedom Era in Los Angeles, 1955- 1980 which was inspired by his dissertation entitled Student Engagement, Cultural Politics, and the Black Students Movement: A Case Study in Los Angeles, 1965- 1975. Claybrook's publications include "David L. Horne- Biographical Reflections, A Living Pan African Scholar-Activist" and "Black Student Alliance" an entry in the Black Power Encyclopedia. Claybrook teaches courses on African and African American history, Critical Thinking, and Research Methods in Africana Studies.

Claybrook is also the Educational and Cultural Director of the nonprofit organization "Natural-WE Community", which seeks to empower, educate, and heal African/ Black communities in the greater Los Angeles area through culturally and educationally enriched programs, events, and workshops.

Brenda Pulido Villanueva

Workshop Description: In this interactive workshop, participants will explore how the joy of dance has been used by immigrant and slave communities as a form of resistance and healing. Participants will learn about cultural practices through Afro Latinx music and dance inspired in Peruvian Festejo (Afro-Peruvian music and dance forms). Finally, participants will have the opportunity to experience and/or observe Afro Latinx dance as a contemporary practice that is historically rooted in resistance and healing in the context of social inequality and oppression. (Dance is optional for participants, no previous experience needed)
Presenter: Brenda Pulido Villanueva
Location: Room No: 306 (cap: 30)

Brenda Pulido Villanueva grew up dancing in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico. Brenda has a B.A. in International Development Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and a M.A. in Social and Cultural Analysis of Education from California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). She has trained in dance disciplines such as Folklórico Mexicano, Ballet, Jazz, Afro-Peruvian, West African, Flamenco, Bachata (Dominican Republic), Afro-Cuban, and Festejo (Peru). Brenda has shared the joy of dance through various workshops at the Creative Arts Coalition to Transform Urban Space (CACtTUS) community space in Long Beach and at both the University Honors Program and the Carolyn Campagna Kleefeld Contemporary Art Museum at CSULB. Brenda is an Academic Advisor at CSULB.

Time: 2:45 - 3:30PM

Melina Abdullah

Keynote title: The Rise of New White Supremacy and What it Means for Black People
Keynote description: The campaign and presidency of Donald Trump has ushered in a new white supremacist era, manifesting in terms of rhetoric, policy, and White supremacist violence. Beyond resistance, Black people and allies are challenged to vision and organize alternative political, economic, and social models that beat back the kind of blatant oppression now faced.

Dr. Melina Abdullah is a recognized expert on race, gender, class, and social movements. She was among the original group of organizers that convened to form Black Lives Matter and continues to serve as a Los Angeles chapter leader.

She is also Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Abdullah earned her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in Political Science and her B.A. from Howard University in African American Studies. Read More

Professor Abdullah is a womanist scholar-activist, understanding the role that she plays in the academy as intrinsically linked to broader struggles for the liberation of oppressed people. Professor Abdullah is a leader in the fight for Ethnic Studies in the K-12 and university systems and was a part of the historic victory that made Ethnic Studies a requirement in the Los Angeles Unified School District, also serving on the Taskforce for the Advancement of Ethnic Studies for the California State University system.

Abdullah is the author of numerous articles and book chapters, with subjects ranging from coalition-building to womanist mothering. She has contributed to popular media outlets, including The Root, Los Angeles Times, Truthdig, Los Angeles Sentinel, Los Angeles Progressive, and BK Nation.

She is also co-host and co-producer of the weekly radio program Beautiful Struggle which airs on KPFK, part of the Pacifica radio network, and hosts and produces the weekly internet radio show “Move the Crowd,” which airs on Radio Justice (radiojustice.org).

From 2014-2018, Dr. Abdullah served on the Los Angeles County Human Relations Commission, where she initiated and chaired the county-wide hearings on community experiences with policing and was instrumental in replacing Columbus Day with Indigenous People’s Day. Dr. Abdullah also serves on a number of boards for, among others, the Black Community, Clergy and Labor Alliance (BCCLA), California Faculty Association-Los Angeles, Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA-CAN), and the National Association for Ethnic Studies.

Melina is the recipient of many awards, most recently the 2018 Community Service Award from National Council for Black Studies, 2017 Unsung Heroes Award from the Oscar Grant Foundation, 2017 Extraordinary Service Award from the African Heritage Studies Association, 2017 Justice Work Award from Beyond the Bars, 2017 Freedom Fighter Award from the NAACP, 2017 Activist Award presented by the National Association for Ethnic Studies, among numerous others.

She has appeared on MSNBC, CNN, TV One, ABC, PBS, Revolt TV, KTLA, KCET, BET, Free Speech TV, and Al-Jazeera, and is featured in the films "Waking the Sleeping Giant," "13th," "When Justice Isn’t Just," and "Justice or Else" and in the television series "Two Sides."

Melina is originally from Oakland, California. She is a single “soccer mama” of three children and resides in Mid-City Los Angeles.

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Dr. Maulana Karenga is professor and chair of the Department of Africana Studies at California State University—Long Beach

Dr. Karenga is the creator of the pan-African cultural holiday Kwanzaaand the Nguzo Saba(The Seven Principles) and author of the authoritative text titled Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family, Community and Culture. Read More

An activist-scholar, he is chair of the organization Us and the National Association of Kawaida Organizations; and Executive director of the African American Cultural Center and the Kawaida Institute of Pan-African Studies; and also co-chair of the Black Community, Clergy and Labor Alliance, BCCLA

Dr. Karenga is also the author of numerous scholarly articles and books including:

  • Essays on Struggle: Position and Analysis
  • Kawaida and Questions of Life and Struggle
  • Maat, The Moral Ideal in Ancient Egypt: A Study in Classical African Ethics
  • Introduction to Black Studies, 4thEdition
  • Odu Ifa: The Ethical Teachings

He is currently writing a book on the social and ethical philosophy of Malcolm X titled The Liberation Ethics of Malcolm X: Critical Consciousness, Moral Grounding and Transformative Struggle.

Dr. Karenga is the recipient of numerous awards for scholarship, leadership and service including the Paul Robeson-Zora Neale Hurston Award for Scholarly Work Significantly Contributive to the Understanding, Development and Appreciation of African World Culture and The C.L.R. James Award for Outstanding Publication of Scholarly Works that Advance the Discipline of Africana and Black Studies, both from the National Council for Black Studies

He is also the subject of the book by Dr. Molefi Asante titled: Maulana Karenga: An Intellectual Portrait.